Difference between revisions of "Verse:Lõis/Music"

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===L-Yiddish music===
 
===L-Yiddish music===
 
[[Judeo-Gaelic|L-Yiddish]] music (both liturgical chants, religious songs and popular music) is a combination of Corded Ware meantone and Levantine tetrachordal traditions.  
 
[[Judeo-Gaelic|L-Yiddish]] music (both liturgical chants, religious songs and popular music) is a combination of Corded Ware meantone and Levantine tetrachordal traditions.  
 +
 
====Rhythm====
 
====Rhythm====
 
Differs from our Ashkenazi music in several ways:
 
Differs from our Ashkenazi music in several ways:
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Solo voices may be either sung or rapped, and wordless singing may be used.
 
Solo voices may be either sung or rapped, and wordless singing may be used.
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====Famous artists and composers====
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*Buayăch (Boudica) Chană (בּואייאך חנה) is a famous Jewish music artist of Judeo-Gaelic background.
  
 
==Khuamnisht music==
 
==Khuamnisht music==

Revision as of 22:33, 12 February 2020

Azalic music

Instruments

The generic term for a string instrument in Newton, up until around the 12th century, was bine /baɪn/ (Old Togarmite: bīn; Togarmite: bin; Persian: bîn, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *wī́nā). The word "bine" today refers to a specific kind of string instrument, which looks roughly like a mandocello or bouzouki, and is the most commonly played Azalic instrument.

Other common instruments are the violin and viola, borrowed from Corded Ware musical traditions; the Greek psaltery; and the bladyphone, a Greek double-headed drum (identical to our timeline's mridangam).

Theory

Medieval Azalic and Togarmite music used a 22 tone system, as described in the treatise Theory of Melody and Harmony by the theorist Darius Jamsheedian.

Inspiration: Nāṭyaśāstra by Bharata

Modern Azalic and Togarmite music uses tetrachords tuned in just intonation intervals.

Musical forms

Both vocal and instrumental forms are prevalent in Newton; dance-dramas based on Azalic and Togarmite mythology are also commonly performed and make use of both vocal and instrumental styles. Instrumental music usually consists of chamber and solo pieces which make extensive use of improvisation.

Composers

  • Darius Jamsheedian (Togarmite: Dariuš Žemšidjan) - 11th century composer of bine music; author of Theory of Melody and Harmony
  • The New Complexity movement, originating in the 12th century
  • Nahid Mitherton (Togarmite: Nėhid Meiþyrtyn) - 13th century inventor of the Tonality Diamond
  • Ommeed Wasishtian (Togarmite: Ømid Wasištjan) - 17th century instrument designer and music theorist, designed the modern bine fret pattern

Eastern European music

Galatian music

L-Yiddish music

L-Yiddish music (both liturgical chants, religious songs and popular music) is a combination of Corded Ware meantone and Levantine tetrachordal traditions.

Rhythm

Differs from our Ashkenazi music in several ways:

  • Scotch snaps
  • 5/4 and 7/4 meters also common

Theory

The tuning is standardized to 31-tone equal temperament, which mathematician Șimăn Așăr Oh Moilăgon (שמעון אשר אָה מוילאגּאָן) independently theorized about and wrote the first Hebrew-language treatise on in the 12th century. Oh Moilăgon also built the first 31-tone organ in Lõis, with a 2-dimensional grid layout. Kabbalist Yăchézcăl Oh Dăchărti (יחזקל אָה דאכארטי) had previously noted a connection between the diatonic scale in 19-tone equal temperament and the 19-year Metonic cycle used in the Hebrew calendar.

Usually L-Yiddish melodies are based around tetrachords, either diatonic tetrachords or tetrachords with neutral or septimal intervals. However, improvised melodies tend to stray outside the tetrachordal theory and explore microtonal shades of intervals.

Art music may be much more harmonic. One art music style, pioneered by 18th century secular Polish-Jewish composer Eliezer McNachman, tends to use

  • beating chords that contrast with stable chords such as otonal or 5-limit chords
  • modulating via unexpected harmonic connections

This style is inspired in part by Kabbalah; in McNachman's words, the style attempts to "peer into the realm of ultimate light by interrogating the light that we see each day. Indeed, our delving as deeply as we humanly can is one manifestation of the Infinite in our world."

Forms

Song structures include:

  • [A B1] [A B2] ... and [A1 B] [A2 B] .... structures inspired by L-Yiddish liturgical melodies for piyyutim with refrains.
  • so-called 'recursive structures' such as ABA CDC ABA.
  • Through-composed songs (with no repeating sections), which usually tell a story.
  • The L-Hasidic style can emphasize danceable rhythms and repetition like our Hasidim, or use choir or contemplative slow solo singing in an imitation of the McNachmanian style.

Subject matter

Secular songs are usually in Judeo-Gaelic or Hebrew; they tend to deal with Jewish folklore or daily life and work. Dance music and songs for special occasions like holidays and weddings also exist.

Educational songs meant for children (teaching the foundational tenets of the Jewish faith) are often performed in Jewish schools. Their performances are corporeal à la Partch and almost theater-like, using a lot of gestures, stage movements and even stage props.

Instruments

Lõisian "klezmer" (clezmăr) uses fixed pitch instruments, usually harps, guitars, harpsichords or organs (imported from Corded Ware music), in addition to the standard Azalic repertoire of Azalic bines, violins, violas, cellos, basses, Greek psalteries, and mridangams. A Jewish harpsichord is normally tuned to a 19-note subset of 31-tone equal temperament, but concert harpsichords have the full 31-note gamut.

Solo voices may be either sung or rapped, and wordless singing may be used.

Famous artists and composers

  • Buayăch (Boudica) Chană (בּואייאך חנה) is a famous Jewish music artist of Judeo-Gaelic background.

Khuamnisht music

Camalic music

Bactrian and Palkhan music

Ancient Bactrians/Palkhans used a twelve-tone system based on quarter comma meantone. This inspired the Gregorian calendar (with month lengths roughly matching the meantone steps).

Most modern Bactrian music expands the ancient system to 19 tones, but some avant-garde composers use 31 tones to the octave, to get closer approximations to the scales used in Newton.

Siészal music

New World music