Dyimkumt

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Dyimkumt
Dyimkumt
Progress: 48%
Type
Alignment
Tripartite
Head direction
Initial Mixed Final
Primary word order
Subject-verb-object
Tonal
No
Declensions
Yes
Conjugations
Yes
Genders
none
Nouns decline according to...
Case Number
Definiteness Gender
Verbs conjugate according to...
Voice Mood
Person Number
Tense Aspect


General information

Phonology

Consonants

Bilabial Labio-dental Dental Alveolar Post-Alveolar Alveolo-palatal Palatal Velar Labial-velar Glottal
Nasal m n ŋ
Plosive p b t d k g
Fricative f v θ ð s z ʃ ɕʰ h
Affricate
Approximant r j w
Lateral app. l

Vowels

Front Near-front Central Near-back Back
Close i u
Near-close ɪ ʊ
Close-mid e o
Mid ə
Open-mid
Near-open
Open a

Diphthongs:

  • au [aʊ]
  • ei [ei]
  • ui [ʊi]
  • ou [oʊ]
  • eu [eu]
  • yy1 [i]
  1. yy technically isn't a diphthong.

Writing to Phonotactics

The alphabet for Dyimkumt is relatively simple:

Upper case A C E F G H I L M N O P R S T U Y
Lower case a c e f g h i l m n o p r s t u y
IPA Normal IPA [a] [ɕʰ] [e] [f] [g] [h] [ɪ] [l] [m] [n] [o] [p] [ɹ] [s] [t] [u] [i]
Exceptions in the IPA y_ [ə] -- y_ [a] -- -- -- y_ [i] V_ or _V [j] -- -- -- -- -- _h [ʃ] #_h [θ] _h and not #_ [ð] y_ [ʊ] _V and not _y [j]

This uses the SCA syntax. If you don't know of this, here is a little bit of information:

Key
_ the character
# start (when it is placed before the string) or end (when it is placed after the string)
(...) could be

Phonotactics

The syllable pattern is "C[yV/r[V/D]/V/D]N"(using awkword syntax), where C is a constant, V is a vowel, D is a vowel diphthong, and N is a nasal.

Basic grammar

Dialects

In Dyimkumt, you naturally group subject and verbs together as well as tense identifiers. All of of these you do with an apostrophe, which, verbally, can be spoken different ways. One way is to "invert" the aspiration on the next constant,(common to cyangeuhen dialect) like 't would be pronounced [tʰ], 'c, the exception, would now not be aspirated because it naturally is aspirated. Another way is to pronounce a glottal stop, common to most hebertan tribe dialects. The most uncommon way is to pronounce a bilabial click, ([ʘ]) which can be found in the unkisa dialect, a very small and weird dialect.

Another mix up between dialects is whether you have a apostrophe before every tense identifier, or in between every tense identifier. For my purposes, I will use the cyangeuhen standards, having an apostrophe before

Vocabulary

Swadesh list

Example texts